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http://youtu.be/xERJ6TneF10

(C) 2015 Edward C Lunnon

8 years 7 months ill …

Physical: Deuce / Mental: Ed

ED is in wED for just three more weeks. Then, to quote the late Nelson Mandela, “I will be retiring from retirement”!

My weekly talks each Wednesday at 10h30 with Lance du Plessis on AlgoaFM will cease on 29 April, five years and 1 month after our first talk at the end of March 2010. I will have been interviewed 260 times.

The purpose of our initial discussion was to raise awareness about neurological illnesses. I retire in the knowledge that we have achieved that, but only too aware that it is but the first stepping stone in a lengthy pathway littered with many obstacles.

As long as my illness allows me, I will continue to write … And I hope that you and many others will continue to read!

Mandela: Reporting His Death and the Search for the Truth

INTERESTING READ!

View the original article at  http://guardianlv.com/2013/10/mandela-reporting-his-death-and-the-search-for-the-truth/

Added by Graham Noble on October 5, 2013.
Saved under Editorial, Graham Noble, Nelson Mandela, South Africa
Tags: spot

The Las Vegas Guardian Express began reporting Nelson Mandela’s death June 26 and our search for the truth began immediately; not the truth of whether or not the former South African President was dead, for, of that report, we were already certain, but the truth behind why his death was being covered up. That search continues, but nothing we have uncovered leads us to suspect that Madiba still lives.

The timeline of how and why we reported the event has been recounted in several articles in this publication. In short; a text message was received by one of our South African correspondents, Laura Oneale, stating that Mandela had just died. According to the message, sent by an employee of the South African Broadcasting Company (SABC), the anti-Apartheid crusader had passed away sometime late in the day of June 25. During a hastily convened editorial meeting, it was decided that a select team of reporters and editors would begin to search for further information and work on one or more stories, reporting the man’s death and recounting his life.

In truth, the team was not completely of one mind, regarding how quickly we should release the news; erroneous media reports of Mandela’s death had been published in the past, followed by hasty retractions and apologies. Nevertheless, our source was exceptionally well-placed and there was no reason whatsoever to believe that this source would have even considered providing us with this information without being absolutely certain; the repercussions, after all, would have been too enormous. Within hours, therefore, we had published two articles announcing that Nelson Mandela had died.

Admittedly, we began second-guessing ourselves but came to the decision that to retract when we had found no evidence that Mandela was still alive ran counter to both our commitment to journalistic integrity and to our self-appointed mission of speaking the truth, no matter how unpleasant, unwanted or politically incorrect.

Las Vegas Guardian Express Editor Michael Smith outside Nelson Mandela’s Pretoria hospital
Having determined that our information was correct, we nevertheless embarked upon a search for the truth behind the cover-up of Mandela’s death. Our founder and publisher, DiMarkco Chandler, made the decision to send one of our top writer/editors to South Africa on a fact-finding mission. UK-Based Michael Smith travelled to South Africa on July 25 and, together with Laura Oneale, met with our original source and others in an attempt to piece together what was happening and why Madiba’s passing was being kept a secret. He returned with intriguing leads and an audio recording of a telephone conversation between a government security contractor and an officer of the South African Defense Force (SADF). Part of this audio was published here. The one statement in this recording which took us by surprise was the SADF officer’s assertion that Mandela had actually passed away on June 11; according to this source, Mandela had suffered total organ failure and was pronounced brain-dead – this came, apparently, from the chief doctor at the Pretoria hospital to which Mandela had been admitted June 8, to be treated for a recurring lung infection.

In the meantime, back in the United States, the Las Vegas Guardian Express website had been subjected to more than one cyber-attack. According to our IT expert, the ‘Denial of Service’ attack – which twice took down the site – had almost certainly originated in South Africa. This merely confirmed our suspicions that we were onto a story that many did not want told. It is only reasonable to assume that, had Nelson Mandela still been alive, our publication would have quickly found itself the recipient of a legal cease and desist order – almost certainly followed by a lawsuit – since, by this time, we had published additional articles that all contained the assertion that the South African icon was no longer with us. Rather than demand a retraction and apology, however, the South African authorities, it seems, attempted to prevent anyone from reading our reports. These incidents merely furthered our resolve; clearly, there was something to hide.

As we began to look into the activities of the Mandela family – particularly, their attempts to gain control of Madiba’s ZAR127 million (approximately $12.5 million) trust – we realized that his death may not have been announced because a dead man can’t be sued for his money. Our audio tape appeared to confirm this. Current South African President Jacob Zuma continued to put out statements that Mandela was “critical, but stable”. Even after it was revealed, by court documents, that Mandela’s doctors had declared him brain-dead and had advised the family to authorize the turning off of the life support machines, Zuma issued a statement denying this. It is very interesting to note that the doctors themselves made no statement; they were not allowed to speak with the media, in fact. Zuma said that the doctors denied saying Mandela was brain-dead. The world’s media reported this as the doctors themselves denying that they had made the prognosis, which was not actually true.

As the weeks went by, no-one other than Zuma and the Mandela family had access to the former leader. Even US President Barack Obama had not been able to see Mandela when he visited the country. Had Mandela still been responsive at that time, as family members had been saying, it is almost certain that the leader of the most powerful nation on Earth would have been granted an audience – however brief.

The Las Vegas Guardian Express became the target of many critics. Although our articles drew many comments from ordinary South Africans who obviously believed what we were reporting – or were at least prepared to accept that we were probably telling the truth – we received many more from people who were disgusted that we continued to report Mandela’s death. We, however, were on a search for the truth; our detractors, by contrast, were merely choosing to believe what the South African authorities were reporting and what was being said in the international media – and those media reports were, themselves, nothing more than reflections of the official statements.

Our publication has been accused of cynically reporting Mandela’s death merely to attract readers and, therefore, financial profit. Such claims are preposterous, since we had dispatched a senior editor to South Africa at a cost that equaled the revenue being generated by all of our Mandela articles combined; although the Las Vegas Guardian Express is a rapidly-rising star in the media universe, we do not yet command the volume of readership that would have enabled us to garner enormous profits from our reporting. Our publication is less than two years old and is a platform for citizen journalism; our decision to report Mandela’s passing – and maintain our position, refusing to retract – could have destroyed the reputation we are building. In short, it was a decision that could have snuffed out our fledgling media site. The risk we took – together with the financial expenses we incurred – far outweigh any profits we have seen from our reporting of this story.

Our South African correspondent, Laura Oneale – a lady who, clearly, cares deeply about her country and its future – was singled out for victimization in sections of the South African media. There are, however, no major media outlets in South Africa that report anything other than that which the authorities approve; South Africa may be, technically, a Democracy, but it is still ruled by those who are Communists at heart and exercise total control, where possible. Whilst it would be unfair to say that the South African media does not dare criticize Zuma or the ruling ANC, their reporting is not totally independent of official influence.

Following Mandela’s ‘discharge’ from hospital, Oneale became the target of scathing reports in South African publications; these reports were bordering on libelous and the publications in question should have been ashamed, particularly since they, themselves, did not have one shred of evidence that Mandela still lived. They were merely repeating the official story, that this 95-year-old man – who had suffered total organ failure and was pronounced brain-dead – was, more than three months later, still allegedly in “critical, but stable, condition” – something that defies almost every law of medical science.

It is, in fact, not entirely beyond the realm of possibility that Mandela was dead and buried sometime in June, although the Las Vegas Guardian Express does not claim to have any definite proof of this, beyond small pieces of circumstantial evidence. On June 26 – the day that the Las Vegas Guardian Express reported Mandela’s passing, the Mandela family and government officials reportedly gathered in Qunu, Mandela’s home. A new access road to the Mandela house was being hastily constructed and a digger was working on a grave. It seems beyond doubt that preparations had begun in earnest for the icon’s burial, but what actually transpired is not clear. It is worth noting that these events took place before the conclusion of the Mandela family court battle to relocate the remains of the deceased Mandela children, so the grave that was being prepared was not for any of them.

More than three months have now passed since we brought Nelson Mandela’s death to the world. In that time, not one media organization can claim to have irrefutable, first-hand proof that Mandela still lives; neither the Mandela family, nor the South African government, have provided any proof that he remains a living, functioning human being.

We have never attempted to disrespect Mandela’s name or legacy. We recognize his imperfections and acknowledge that there are those who liked neither the man nor his ideology. Regardless, we humbly submit that he achieved remarkable things. We have never presumed to pass judgement upon him, nor blindly worship him. We have merely reported what no-one else has dared to report: That he has passed away and that his family and government continue to pretend otherwise, for their own gain.

We, at this point, would still, obviously, be willing to retract our reports; our integrity means more to our team than suffering the embarrassment of admitting that we were wrong. That situation, however, will not come to pass. It is time for the South African government and the living relatives of Nelson Mandela to end this charade and announce the man’s passing. If they will not do that, it is time for them to provide media access to Mandela. We do not expect the man to suffer the indignity of being surrounded by a gaggle of reporters and photographers; a short, private audience with a member of our staff would suffice. No photographs, no questions; merely an opportunity for a trusted individual to say that they have seen Mandela with their own eyes and that he remains alive.

Without such a request being granted, we maintain that we reported his death accurately and we continue to search for the truth.

An editorial by Graham J Noble on behalf of the Las Vegas Guardian Express staff.

Madiba Magic

©2013 Edward C. Lunnon

Monday 24 June 2013: 6 years 9 months on …

Physical: Deuce/ Mental: ED

Madiba, we are told, is critically ill today. Our thoughts are with him and his family.

Exactly eighteen years ago, he stood at Ellis Park holding the Rugby World Cup aloft. The Springboks had beaten the All Blacks and were the 1995 World Cup Champions.

It is considered one of the turning points in the building of our fragile new democracy.

Pera and I were at the maternity ward of St George’s Hospital here in Port Elizabeth. We spent the day there!

It was a turning point in the life of one Phillip John Lunnon. Pera was 25 weeks pregnant with Phillip, but he had decided that today was the day. No more waiting for September!

Thanks to skilful work by the gynaecologists, thy managed to keep him in there … until on 7 July 1995 he was eventually brought into the world by Dr Ivan Berkowitz at 27 weeks!

He – all 1,3kg of him – lodged in an incubator at St Georges for about a month until his homecoming.

We will celebrate his 18th birthday in two weeks time. He is now our tallest family member at 192cm!

We are truly blessed with two wonderful sons.

DSC_0109

The Walk to Freedom

©2012 Edward C. Lunnon

Monday 13 February 2012: 5 years 5 months on … Advantage CBD

Last Saturday morning, Sean and I left Stellenbosch, crossing Sir Lowry’s Pass in the rain. Behind us, False Bay and the Hottentots-Holland basin lay basking in the sun.

The weather mirrored my mood.

It had been another trip of sunshine and rain.

It took a while to convince myself that I was able to do another long trip by car. Travelling is just becoming that much more difficult for me. It’s far easier and less frustrating just to stay at home. But I have to guard against becoming a couch potato, and I really have been nowhere since the last trip to Nieu-Bethesda in December.

A last-minute decision on the previous Thursday saw us deciding to make a trip to the Western Cape and the Cape of Good Hope. Sean had not yet started his second year at university and I am retired – so we had the time! Sean was keen to see his mates in Stellenbosch. Did I have the will?

I was keen to attend the Il Divo concert in Cape Town – I have enjoyed their music for a few years now. Once I had ascertained that there were still tickets available, I booked and the decision was made. Cape Town – here we were coming!

We left on Monday morning, heading westwards along the N2, stopping at the Storms River Bridge and in George and arriving in Stellenbosch (my birthplace and centre of learning) at 18h00. The temperature peaked at 43 degrees Celsius somewhere near Riversdale – we were grateful for auto air-conditioning and the car seemed the best place to be!

Straight on to the Danie Craven Stadium to watch Maties play in the Varsity Cup against TUT (Tshwane University of Technology) and then on to The Akker and the pizzeria next door for pizza supper with Sean’s friends David and Graham Clarke, David Bryant,  Neil Wessels and others.

Then we went on to Durbanville to the Wüsts where we would be staying for the week.  It was from their home five years ago to the week that I proceeded to theTygerberg Hospital to be informed of the diagnosis of CBD. This was the birthday week that I was supposed not to have seen!

Tuesday saw us heading for the Cape Town docks and Robben Island (Rob = seal in Afrikaans). We had tried so many times before to view the Museum there and each time the trip had been cancelled because of poor weather or a malfunctioning boat! So it was with a bit of apprehension that we headed for the docks.

But this time it happened, and we were joined for the trip by my nephew-in-law Sebastian Ridgway.

(As a student, I had previously visited the Island, when it was still a prison, for a dinner-dance one Saturday evening. We had gone across on the ferry in the dark, danced the night away, drunk copious volumes of alcohol, eaten the best of sea-foods garnered from the cold waters of the Atlantic Ocean that surround the Island, and returned on the ferry at 3in the morning, with many passengers returning their sea-food to the self-same place from whence it had come!)

This day-time ferry trip crossing the some 14 km took some thirty minutes. Although it was quite hazy, the trip reveals a magnificent view of Table Mountain, Devil’s Peak and Lion’s Head. In fact, you see Table Bay as you have never seen it before. Indeed, the “fairest Cape in all the world”!

Once on the Island we were bussed to the Robben Island village (where the prison warders and now the museum staff live – and where we had previously partied) and to  the various prisons (that one for criminals, the one for low-level political prisoners and then that maximum prison that was reserved for “The Leaders”  – Nelson Mandela and the rest!)

If the view from the boat is spectacular, then the backdrop of Table Mountain from the Island is something to see to believe. The history of the Island, as told to us by the guide, from penal dump to leper colony, through prisons, to the museum of today makes for interesting listening. It is almost a summary of the history of our country – something not to be missed if you are visiting Cape Town!

 

Too soon we were walking from Madiba’s cell back down the road to the boat in the Island harbour and back to the Mother City.

The time spent on the Island is not nearly enough to take in all the history and the scenery. I felt quite guilty when I realised that I had partied the night away way back in the seventies in a hall just a few hundred yards away from prisoner 46664, Nelson Mandela, then “terrorist” and now our beloved Madiba and retired first president of the democratic New South Africa.

How the world has changed in less than thirty years. Last Saturday when we drove back to PE, 11 February, was the 22nd anniversary of Nelson’s release from prison, and we still remember those pictures when we saw him for the first time leaving prison in Paarl with Winnie, his then wife, clenched fists in the air and part of his long walk to freedom!

Anyway back to Cape Town. Sean spent the evening with friends, I collected him the next morning, we visited the Waterfront, found a sushi spectacular and then headed off to the Grand West Arena for the Il Divo concert. It was the opening evening of their current world tour. What a privilege to see them in person and to hear such big voices.

Thursday was visiting day in the Hottentots-Holland basin – first my high school in Somerset West* which takes its name from the basin and where I matriculated in 1974 with, as the Honours Board now tells you, one of the two A aggregates of that year; then my sister, Lyn in Strand and then my Aunty Doreen and Uncle Peter at Bikini Beach in Gordon’s Bay.

Then we head back to Durbanville to have dinner with my neurologist, Franclo Henning and his wife Helen. Five years and one day to the date after my diagnosis – we joke about the prognosis I was given and jokingly discuss the law suit regarding the timeline that I should not have made five years!    

This is my long walk to freedom …  how long will I be imprisoned in this decaying body and who knows when I will experience my day with that clenched fist in the air and cross the divide into the unknown that lies ahead?

Thursday was my day – I think Sean must have found it quite boring – so Friday was his day! We went to Stellenbosch, had lunch in the Neelsie (the Student Union), then left him with his friends for the day and night, and visited some of my student friends at Helshoogte (my ex-residence of six years).

Then, for me, back to Durbanville for a farewell braai with Gretel and Willem.

It was the end of another very busy week … early Saturday morning, we left Stellenbosch headed eastwards to Plettenberg Bay for a quick visit to the Bryants, and then back to Port Elizabeth (to the news that Whitney Houston had died at the age of 48! Her walk to freedom, like Michael Jackson and Amy Winehouse before her, was also at an end.)

I was exhausted but excited and elated that I had once again gone home to The Cape of Good Hope.

Dare I hope for another visit?  In the meantime, I’ll just keep on walking …

 * My grateful thanks are extended to Sunette Fourie for inviting me back to the school and for being such an excellent hostess and tour guide. She is the only teacher still at HHH who was there when I was there as a pupil. The only other person from my era still there is Kevin Dockrall who was in class with me and is now a teacher at the school. It was great catching up with him too in the staffroom at break time.